A Disabled Friendly Night Out In Leeds

Planning a night out with a physical disability can be a challenge. From that strategically placed step, which you weren’t expecting to finding out there is no disabled loo, all these little challenges can stop from getting out the door. Leeds is a beautiful city though and is full of accessible venues. So we’ve put together a little list to give you some ideas for a good disabled friendly night out in Leeds.

Places To Eat

 

Leeds is a foodie’s paradise. Whatever you’re in the mood for, whenever you are in the mood for it, you should be able to find it in Leeds. Below, we will give you a few ideas to get you started.

Chaophraya

 

Chaophraya has easy access to the train and bus station. It has nice wide walk ways, a good size lift and the disabled toilet isn’t too shabby either. Check it out here.

Trinity Kitchen

With a concept that is completely unique, Trinity Kitchen rotates six new street food vans every eight weeks and offers visitors the chance to experience various flavours and cuisines under one roof.

As an added bonus, Trinity Kitchen is not a bad little spot if you are disabled either. There are staff on hand to help you carry, fetch or clear up. There is plenty of room for move (even if you have large power chair) and the disabled loos are very specious. Although the toilets do not have full changing facilities.

Trinity stays open late and has a few spacious lifts leading to it.

Learn more here.

 

Shears Yard

 

Leeds is about independent traders and there are few better examples of that than Shears Yard. Located on the Calls, which are cobblestone heavy but don’t let that stop you!

Most of the way can be negotiated on easy to use footpaths. If you enter via the front door, you will see steps but there is entrance on the lower ground that staff can open for you. All you have to do is ask. If you book ahead for your disabled friendly Night out in Leeds, the door will already be open!

 

Places To Go For A Drink

If you are just after a casual drink, here are some ideas for your disabled friendly night out in Leeds.

Calls Landing

Callings Landing is a must in the summer or the winter. The outside decking can be bit tricky for people with mobility issues but there are spots around the deck where you can bunker down. Inside, everywhere is nice and flat, and the disabled loo is easily accessible. Find out more here.

Tapped

Tapped is an American-Style Brew Pub.  Serving 27 draft beers including 13 cask ales and 14 craft keg beers.  100+ bottled beers from around the world.  Topped off with beer dough stone baked pizzas made from scratch on site.

There is a lot to like about Tapped but what we like most, is the one level design. Everything from the bar to the toilet is on the one level. The pizza isn’t bad too. Find out more here. 

The Adelphi

 

If you want a traditional British pub experience, then The Adelphi is the place for your disabled friendly night out in Leeds.

End Venues

 

So where do you go till the wee small hours? Here are some ideas…

Belgrave

 

Belgrave Music Hall and Canteen is a Leeds gem and should be on your list for a disabled friendly night out In Leeds. There is an easily accessible door down the side of the building. The disabled toilet is not half bad and simple to get to and the walkways are pretty wide. Find out more here.

Brudenell Social Club

If you like your gigs and want to support your local venues – The Brudenell Social Club is the place. Easy to get in and out, and so many vantage points from which to get a good view from.

There are some ideas to get you started. But do not stop there, get out and find some gems of your own!

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A day out in London in a wheelchair can seem like a daunting experience.

It is all about answering questions like:

“How do I get around?”

“Where are all the accessible loos?”

“What are the best wheelchair friendly attractions?”

Hopefully this short blog should help you answer some of these questions and have better London experience. As always with everything

 

Getting Around

 

Transport For London have concentrated efforts and minds to in their words:

“Find out more about our ongoing efforts to make travelling in London accessible for everyone.”

Many more Tube stations, boats and bus stations, now have ramps, lifts and flat services. Additionally, you can find about the facilities at each station here.

However, you might still find to really enjoy your Day Out In London In A Wheelchair, you need to use a taxi service.

Uber

Uber is a ride hailing app that uses the GPS in your smartphone to get to where you need to be. You can pretty much get a vehicle of any shape and size in London. This includes accessible vans for those who cannot transfer through Uber WAV. If you need help, go for the Assist option and you will get a specially trained driver to help you. Assist does not cost you extra and can be much cheaper than the traditional black cabs.

Also because Uber charges you direct to a debit/credit card, you cannot be overcharged unfairly!

Have You Considered The Train

Day out in a wheelchair in London

 

Trains are one of the most universally accessible modes of public transport. If you are planning a day in London in a wheelchair, going on the train may be cheaper, faster and more straight forward.

How does it work?

If you are travelling on a any of the major service providers, you can book assistance at both ends of the journey. Assistance can be given to help you get on and off the train, and navigate the stations. This can include putting ramps down, carrying luggage and onboard.

The onboard assistance is interesting. For example, if you cannot get to the buffet car but want something, staff will fetch it for you. Also if a toilet breaks make sure you exercise your right to be moved.

To book assistance, either do so when you purchase tickets at a station or see: http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/stations_destinations/disabled_passengers.aspx 

Changing Places

 

Not all disabled toilets are made equal. For some of us, we need proper facilities and they can sometimes be hard to find. Your best bet is to look at http://www.changing-places.org/find_a_toilet.aspx

Things To Do

 

London Eye Experience for the disabled

 

We’ve done a few London attraction reviews before. See below for a few ideas about where to go:

Harry Potter World

London Eye

 

See More

https://ethosdisability.com/market-reviews/quokka-bag/

 

The right mix of products and knowledge can bridge the gap for a disabled student. But what sort of things make a good disabled student toolkit?

The Essentials

 

Your Phone

Yes this is obvious but that doesn’t mean you should not include it! Your phone will always be a critical part of your disabled student toolkit. From apps to comms, your phone can do it all!

It is important to remembered however; that your phone can be a useful study tool. From taking pictures of important info to recording audio – don’t forget to use your phone for uni.

A Tablet

Tablets can be cheap and they are very useful. They have very similar functions to your phone but pack a lot more power. From longer battery life to more advance apps, who needs a PC these days?

Tablets are often lighter and more compact – meaning that if you cannot carry that much – go for tablet over a laptop.

Pillboxes

Medication management can be a pain. Keeping track of your meds, while you are out and about can be a pain but the stylish Sabi products have you covered. Check them out here.

Maybes

Nimble

Nimble is the one finger cutter that makes plastic packaging easier to handle. Check it out here – https://version22.com/product/nimble/

Bibs

If you drool (and many people do) – a stylish bib can make all the difference. You can take it off and on as you please and they wash well.

If You Are Wheelchair User

Quokka Bag

Quokka Bag

The Quokka Bag is a great little item that attaches to most wheelchairs. If you are a wheelchair user, it can be a great addition to your disabled student toolkit. It basically functions like a third pocket and make it easier to reach essentials quickly.

 

If you enjoyed this article – please consider buying our disabled students guide- https://ethosdisability.com/product/ethos-disabled-students-guide/ .

It has loads more useful information and costs the same as coffee!

 

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